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Templates

NSCA Foundation members have exclusive access to a range of useful and up to date W/OHS templates to assist your organisation’s work activities. Become an NSCA Foundation member today and benefit from a variety of member resources.

Please note: Templates are examples only, please ensure you verify that they are relevant to the state or territory in which you intend to use them.

How to use the templates

Achieve Work Health and Safety compliance – the goal seems simple enough – everyone goes home safe to family and community at the end of the work day, and safe and sustainable business activities continue to flourish and grow.

An effective work health and safety management system considers all the different elements in a workplace that can have an impact on providing and maintaining a safe working environment for workers and others.

Achieving safety goals requires planning, information, action, collaboration, monitoring and review. No matter how massive the task, if you break it down into the steps required to reach your goal then the task becomes manageable and measurable, and the goals become both realistic and achievable.

NSCA Foundation templates are designed to be tailored to fit your organisation – whether your work activities are complex or simple, an evolving safety management system starts with six basic steps:

  1. A plan to work safely
  2. Policies, procedures and processes
  3. Induction, training and supervision
  4. Consultation
  5. Monitoring and review
  6. Reporting

Whether you build or adopt a work health and safety management system – it must always be tailored to be specific to your business activities, hazards and risks and must be implemented as an ‘evolving’ system that lives within your every-day business culture and is considered by all to be ‘business as usual’.

1. A plan to work safely

A safety plan should be an active part of your business plan, including budget allocation in each financial year to enable implementation and measurable performance indicators to identify whether the plan is effective.

The safety plan should ensure that management and workers clearly understand their safety responsibilities, how to comply, and are all accountable for carrying out their responsibilities.

Help Members can access a free example Safety Assessment Checklist. To become a member and gain access to member resources and support, join or renew today.

Safety Assessment ChecklistView preview

2. Policies, procedures and processes

Policies, procedures and processes outline the organisation’s documented expectations of management and worker’s safety behaviour and leadership, record keeping, step by step procedures for work activities, injury and incident reporting and provide both guidelines for work and behaviour and support for the way that work is done.

Help Members can access a free example Safety Policy. To become a member and gain access to member resources and support, join or renew today.

Safety Policy

3. Induction, training and supervision

Everyone who has access to your workplace should receive an appropriate level of induction, training and supervision so they understand the rules of the organisation and site.

Clients and visitors need to be aware that they should follow simple rules and signage, such as not entering areas marked for workers only or advising workers of spills or breakages.

All workers need to be inducted and provided with essential work health and safety information, and assessed for both training needs and the appropriate level of supervision depending on their proven knowledge, skills and experience and the hazards, risks and controls involved in their work tasks.

Help Members can access a free example Induction Checklist. To become a member and gain access to member resources and support, join or renew today.

Induction Checklist View preview

4. Consultation

Effective consultation with workers is critical to ensure that policies, procedures and processes are developed that are relevant to the actual work tasks carried out by workers, and to ensure that workers have both ownership and commitment to their work health and safety responsibilities.

Consultation between management and workers enables decision making, actions and accountability across all levels and further demonstrates consistent commitment to working safely so everyone goes home safe to family and community at the end of the work day.

Help Members can access a free example Record of Safety Talk Checklist. To become a member and gain access to member resources and support, join or renew today.

Record of Safety Talk

5. Monitoring and review

Monitoring the effectiveness of your safety management system analyses its strengths and weaknesses and identifies whether the system is working as intended, analyses gaps (such as the introduction of new equipment or processes requiring risk assessment and elimination or control, training, additional personal protective equipment) and areas for improvement.

Monitoring and review is critical when investigating injuries and incidents to identify the cause and prevent the injury or incident from happening again.

Help Members can access a free example Incident Report. To become a member and gain access to member resources and support, join or renew today.

Incident Report View preview

6. Reporting

Reporting on the effectiveness of your safety management system is required at all levels, whether as part of the business planning cycle or ground level feedback to workers carrying out the work activities. Two-way communication and honest reporting on what worked well, what didn’t work well, what actions will be taken, and by when, to rectify and improve the safety management system is critical to ensuring management and workers are involved and committed to working safely.

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