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Young workers’ presenteeism costs more than their absenteeism.

The finding is part of a Safe Work Australia study about 23-year-old workers, ‘Work Productivity Loss in Young Workers’.

According to the study, an average of 302 hours per worker, per year, is lost due to presenteeism. This costs $10,674 per worker, per year.

By comparison, the average hours lost per worker due to absenteeism from health-related causes is 53 hours per year. In addition, 175 hours per year is lost due to absenteeism attributed to any reasons other than ill health or vacations.

Absenteeism due to ill health costs an average of $1899 per worker, per year, while absenteeism due to any other reason costs $6198 per worker, per year.

The combined cost of presenteeism and absenteeism is estimated at $18,836 per worker, per year.

For more details, visit the report

Published on 30 July 2015 in the NSCA Foundation Safe-T-Bulletin.

A new study suggests that higher order hazard controls such as elimination and substitution are not being used as much as they should in the manufacturing sector.

“While over 70 per cent of manufacturing workers who reported exposure to noise were provided with a combination of PPE [personal protective equipment] and other types of controls, 20 per cent reported that they were only provided with PPE,” according to the Safe Work Australia report, ‘Work Health & Safety Perceptions: Manufacturing Industry’.

“For vibration, over 30 per cent reported being provided with only PPE and no other control measure.

“Fourteen per cent of manufacturing workers who reported exposure to airborne hazards reported that they were not provided with any control measure for this hazard.”

The study suggests one of two reasons for this: “… either that workers were not aware of higher order control measures in the workplace or that there was a considerable proportion of manufacturing workplaces where higher order control measures were not provided.”

For more details, visit the report.

Published on 12 March 2015 in the NSCA Foundation Safe-T-Bulletin.

The Federal Government’s commission of audit has suggested consolidating a number of safety bodies and privatising the underwriting of the commonwealth workers compensation scheme.

The Phase One Report says Safe Work Australia; Asbestos Safety and Eradication Agency; Comcare; Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Commission; and Seafarers’ Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Authority should be consolidated in the Department of Employment.

The Phase Two Report recommends the Asbestos Safety and Eradication Council should be abolished.

The second report also recommends Comcare’s claims management be outsourced and its workers’ compensation insurance scheme be underwritten by the private sector.

Further, the report advocates that CSR Australia should stop functioning in mid-2015, allowing the private sector to provide rehabilitation services. “Some of CRS Australia’s allied health professionals could be transitioned to the National Disability Insurance Agency,” the report said.

For more detail, visit the commission of audit.

Published on 8 May 2014 in NSCA Safe-T-Bulletin.

A new report suggests that lost time injuries (LTI) should no longer be the focus of measuring work health and safety performance.

Issues in the Measurement and Reporting of Work Health and Safety Performance: A Review isn’t suggesting that injury indicators be discarded altogether. Rather, it advocates using a range of measures including injury and illness outcomes and positive performance indicators.

“Disregarding one or the other would [be] akin to asking investors to choose between receiving a Balance Sheet and an Income Statement: both are important because they provide different perspectives on an organisation’s success – one reflects position and the other reflects performance,” the report says.

The report recommends a shift away from LTIs to Class 1 work-related illness and injury (WRII) outcomes, total recordable injury frequency rates (TRIFR), valid positive performance indicators and the innovation of new approaches to measuring performance.

For more details, visit the report.

Published on 19 December 2013 in NSCA Safe-T-Bulletin.


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